Game improvement players irons - Am I crazy?

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Regular Contributor

A number of years ago, I was struggling with my ball striking so I took a break from traditional players irons and picked up a set of shovels (Callaway X-14 Pros, to be precise). These things were stupid easy to hit, but distance control was a bit of a crap shoot as you were just as likely to fly an 8-iron 175 as you were 150. Gotta love hot spots. I ended up selling them after a couple of months, but the M2 Tours have me intrigued to try this experiement again.

 

I love my RSi TPs (face slot technology is awesome), but I work the ball less than I used to with the modern ball, so the idea of easier to hit "point and shoot" irons is beginning to appeal to me again.

 

- Does anyone here have any experience making a move like this?

- Any experience with the M2 Tours specificially?

- For the TaylorMade guys, has there been any feedback from Tour players with M2 Tour? Has anyone put them into play?

 

My main concerns are related to height and spin. I generally don't have a problem with either of those two things, so my worry is that the ball might fly too high and not have enough spin to control it. Gapping doesn't worry me as I can always throw another wedge in on the low end and remove a long iron if needed.

 

Jesse

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Regular Contributor

Interesting to hear you put some GI irons in play with your index. Aside from a few guys putting a M2 tour 3-iron in play as a driving iron, no one has gamed a full set. M2 tour is still extremely long and forgiving - essentially a GI in a smaller package. 

 

For better players, the issue with GI is the thick topline and the offset. The purpose of PSi was to address those issues with the most forgiveness and distance possible. I gamed the RSi TPs last year and switched into PSi this year and the latter are a world easier to hit. Jason Day hit them at a photoshoot last year and his initial reaction was "they really only wan't to go straight don't they?". This was the standard version and not the PSi Tour. 

 

I think you'd find the same annoyance in distance control with M2 Tour if you have some speed and play to a plus index. I think the non-Tour PSi would be your jam but the only way to find out is to hit them. 

 

I can try to track down a demo day in your area if you're interested. 

Content/Social Media Manager at TaylorMade Golf
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HurstyGolf
Occasional Contributor

@jll62 wrote:

A number of years ago, I was struggling with my ball striking so I took a break from traditional players irons and picked up a set of shovels (Callaway X-14 Pros, to be precise). These things were stupid easy to hit, but distance control was a bit of a crap shoot as you were just as likely to fly an 8-iron 175 as you were 150. Gotta love hot spots. I ended up selling them after a couple of months, but the M2 Tours have me intrigued to try this experiement again.

 

I love my RSi TPs (face slot technology is awesome), but I work the ball less than I used to with the modern ball, so the idea of easier to hit "point and shoot" irons is beginning to appeal to me again.

 

- Does anyone here have any experience making a move like this?

- Any experience with the M2 Tours specificially?

- For the TaylorMade guys, has there been any feedback from Tour players with M2 Tour? Has anyone put them into play?

 

My main concerns are related to height and spin. I generally don't have a problem with either of those two things, so my worry is that the ball might fly too high and not have enough spin to control it. Gapping doesn't worry me as I can always throw another wedge in on the low end and remove a long iron if needed.

 

Jesse


Hey Jesse-

 

For a player of your caliber I probably wouldn't recommend going into a full set of M2 Tour's because you will won't be able to work the ball as much as you currently do, but they are extremely easy to hit and are rockets. There are a few good sticks that work in our HQ that have combo sets with them (M2 Tours in 3-6 iron and PSi irons in 7-PW) so that could be an option you could look into.

 

There are a handful of guys out on TOUR that play an M2 Tour 3-iron as a replacement for a 5 wood/hybrid for specific events (Jordan Niebrugge, Rahm, Rhein Gibson, etc.). I actually have one myself and it is a rocket off the tee, I still prefer my UDI over it because I hit it about 10 yards further, but the M2 Tour is easier to hit for sure.

 

Take a look at a combo set of at least a 3-iron/4-iron if you are struggling in that area with your TP's.

 

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@HurstyGolf
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@jll62 wrote:

A number of years ago, I was struggling with my ball striking so I took a break from traditional players irons and picked up a set of shovels (Callaway X-14 Pros, to be precise). These things were stupid easy to hit, but distance control was a bit of a crap shoot as you were just as likely to fly an 8-iron 175 as you were 150. Gotta love hot spots. I ended up selling them after a couple of months, but the M2 Tours have me intrigued to try this experiement again.

 

I love my RSi TPs (face slot technology is awesome), but I work the ball less than I used to with the modern ball, so the idea of easier to hit "point and shoot" irons is beginning to appeal to me again.

 

- Does anyone here have any experience making a move like this?

- Any experience with the M2 Tours specificially?

- For the TaylorMade guys, has there been any feedback from Tour players with M2 Tour? Has anyone put them into play?

 

My main concerns are related to height and spin. I generally don't have a problem with either of those two things, so my worry is that the ball might fly too high and not have enough spin to control it. Gapping doesn't worry me as I can always throw another wedge in on the low end and remove a long iron if needed.

 

Jesse


In short... yes... you are crazy!

 

All kidding aside, my addition to this discussion is in the bounce can be too much to handle or feel like I make good contact. Especially in wet conditions. You probably pick the ball better than I do, but I had a difficult time with the RSi 1 and RSi 2 in wet/muddy conditions. Instead of a nice divot, the iron skidded into the ball. And I found the RSi TP with much less sole width and bounce. I lost forgiveness, but that's my fault not the clubs.

 

I wish we could get something like the M2 Tour, with it's forgiveness and height, without all of that bounce. 

 

Sounds like a M2 Tour B?? Smiley Happy

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Thanks, guys. Like I said, it's a bit of a crazy thought as I don't know any plus handicaps who play that type of iron through the bag. I hadn't really considered a combo set because I was worried about gapping issues at the switch-over point, but I'm sure that could be figured out with the right set make up. Things to think about. Thanks!

 

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Regular Contributor

@jll62 wrote:

Thanks, guys. Like I said, it's a bit of a crazy thought as I don't know any plus handicaps who play that type of iron through the bag. I hadn't really considered a combo set because I was worried about gapping issues at the switch-over point, but I'm sure that could be figured out with the right set make up. Things to think about. Thanks!

 


I played a combo set for a bit with RSi TP 3-6 and RSi 2 7-P and jump from 6-7 was a joke. If you messed with the loft a bit it could work but I have a very different mentality when it comes to hitting a "blade" and a more forgiving iron. I know I shouldn't but I can't help it. I really think PSi would be ideal for you. 

 

@Ed_Settle - I think PSi would be the closest thing to an M2 Tour B. Otherwise you'd have to grind off some of the bounce of M2 Tour and land somewhere similar. 

 

I sound like I drank the PSi kool-aid... 

Content/Social Media Manager at TaylorMade Golf
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