Getting Fitted

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Henningfeld
Occasional Contributor

Lots of times I see or hear people talking about getting fitted. I'm interested in hearing what this community's take on this subject. Do you feel a players game should be at a certain caliber before getting fitted? I generally recommend lessons for fresh new golfers as I see it being better money spend then getting fitted for a swing and style that likely will change or need change. Do you feel their are benefits going to an independent fitter vs. something like a Golfsmith? Any pro tips on who to look for/what to ask during a fitting? I like getting fitted at a course where I can hit outdoors.

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Frequent Contributor

@Henningfeld wrote:

Lots of times I see or hear people talking about getting fitted. I'm interested in hearing what this community's take on this subject. Do you feel a players game should be at a certain caliber before getting fitted? I generally recommend lessons for fresh new golfers as I see it being better money spend then getting fitted for a swing and style that likely will change or need change. Do you feel their are benefits going to an independent fitter vs. something like a Golfsmith? Any pro tips on who to look for/what to ask during a fitting? I like getting fitted at a course where I can hit outdoors.


I think you make a good point about lesson being very important. But if the clubs are not at least in the ballpark as far as length and weight appropriate for the golfer. Not saying that a nice used set would be a good place to start, but make it the right set. Then go from there.

 

Great topic

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Regular Contributor

I don't think you'll ever find consensus on this topic. Personally, I feel that starting with a set of clubs that are in the ballpark for basic static fitting is more important than immediately taking lessons. If a golfer tries to learn using clubs that are too long/short, light/heavy, etc., they may not be able to do the motions they're being taught. (or worse, the clubs may cause them to compensate in the swing). I also think the concern over outgrowing a set of clubs after taking lessons is overblown. The player's physical attributes are not going to change much in a rapid period due to lessons. The existing clubs should fit for a while.

 

Age is also a big factor. If you're getting a child into the game, I believe it's far more important to make sure they have equipment that fits them, rather than making sure they start out with lessons from the local pro.

 

As for what type of fitting to do, I think that depends primarily upon the skill level of the player. I had an extremely comprehensive iron shaft fitting in November where we tested 15 different shafts to dial in on the top 3. From there, we did more detailed testing of the top 3 before finally a winner. It was an intense, 2.5 hour process that is certainly not suited for the beginner. I personally wouldn't go through a fitting at a big box store, but it would be fine for someone just starting out. But once someone has attained a bit of skill, I think it's independent fitters all day long.

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Frequent Contributor

@jll62 wrote:

I don't think you'll ever find consensus on this topic. Personally, I feel that starting with a set of clubs that are in the ballpark for basic static fitting is more important than immediately taking lessons. If a golfer tries to learn using clubs that are too long/short, light/heavy, etc., they may not be able to do the motions they're being taught. (or worse, the clubs may cause them to compensate in the swing). I also think the concern over outgrowing a set of clubs after taking lessons is overblown. The player's physical attributes are not going to change much in a rapid period due to lessons. The existing clubs should fit for a while.

 

Age is also a big factor. If you're getting a child into the game, I believe it's far more important to make sure they have equipment that fits them, rather than making sure they start out with lessons from the local pro.

 

As for what type of fitting to do, I think that depends primarily upon the skill level of the player. I had an extremely comprehensive iron shaft fitting in November where we tested 15 different shafts to dial in on the top 3. From there, we did more detailed testing of the top 3 before finally a winner. It was an intense, 2.5 hour process that is certainly not suited for the beginner. I personally wouldn't go through a fitting at a big box store, but it would be fine for someone just starting out. But once someone has attained a bit of skill, I think it's independent fitters all day long.


I really hate giving you a Kudo for your response, but I did....Smiley Very Happy Your lead is growing!

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Frequent Contributor

I previously had an instructor who would make sure the clubs I had were in the ballpark and that my swing was consistent before he would fit me. He would run off the voters who would come to the course and would explain that they would adjust the clubs to help minimize the fault and that was bad in the long run. He said that instead of ending with a good, consistent swing that I would make compensations due to the adjustments a footer would put in the club. I have a good friend who went to a golf shop to get new irons and they really added a lot of adjustment which liked great on the launch monitor but he has struggled on the course with them. He went from having an issue with over-hooking the ball occasionally to now missing left and right. I also believe that personal preference and feel are important when choosing irons especially. A good round for me is in the 80's and an average round is in the 90's. I have played cavity back clubs for years and that is what the fitters always recommend. I loved the look and feel of a set of forged blades so I purchased them and my game has improved. I prefer to have minimal offset and really appreciate the immediate feedback I get on shots. When I flush one, it is butter soft. If I thin it, my hands song and it has a very low trajectory with a ton of spin. I always know where on the face I have got the ball and even though these would never have been recommended to me they are the beat performing irons that I've owned.

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TheGreatLang
New Contributor

I think that players should have a some experience before they go to get fit since there swing changes so much during the beginning stages of learning the game. As it pertains to a fittings, if you have a player set on one company have them get fitted by that company. But have the player try a variety of companies first before choosing that set company because you never know the company they want might not be the best fit for them. So with that being said, go with an independent fitter that isn't super bias. Tips: make sure the fitting is about you not that fitter of the company, look for how many fittings they do and what there clients are saying (feedback is important), experience is key. I hope that can help!

- Lang
#TeamTaylorMade
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bigeck
Occasional Contributor

for me i dont have an option of getting fitted, its a must due to my height! im 6ft 8 and around 24 stone off the shelf clubs have me bent over in half!, my current set it up the tollerences of what taylormade do and thats a shame really because for me to have the 'perfect' spine angle etc i could do with having even longer clubs, but my 7 iron is longer than a standard 5 iron! I think the most important thing about being fitted is that you already 'own' a swing. you dont want to get fitted then go speed up your swing by 5mph or even slow it down you need to feel comfortable swinging the same nearly every stroke.

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