Why are lofts on some irons getting stronger?

cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Reply
Community Manager
Community Manager

The topic on irons lofts getting stronger or "loft jacking" if you like, has been widely debated over the last few years. Some people think it's exclusively the pursuit of distance.

 

But that's far from the truth.

 

On (mainly) game improvement irons, lofts are getting stronger because the CG is getting lower and traditional lofts will launch the ball too high.

 

I'm interested to hear from you all on:

 

- do you understand why lofts are getting stronger on some irons?

- is a 30 degree 7 iron nowadays an issue if it still performs as expected?

- is hitting higher and longer shots for mid-high handicap golfers necessarily a bad thing?

 

Would love to know your thoughts on this topic.

 

Here's Rick Shiels' first video on the new M3 and M4 irons with reference to the loft issue:

 

 


@ryanlauder66
0 Kudos
Reply
Regular Contributor

- do you understand why lofts are getting stronger on some irons?  Yes

- is a 30 degree 7 iron nowadays an issue if it still performs as expected?  No

- is hitting higher and longer shots for mid-high handicap golfers necessarily a bad thing?  No

 

The thing that amuses me most is that the consternation comes most strongly from players for whom these irons were never intended. Even Rick falls into this trap during his quick review. It doesn't matter if he's carrying the M4 7-iron 195 yards. These irons are not for him. Rick is reviewing the product as though it's something he might play, rather than from the perspective of a 20 handicap. It's the same on other sites. Those complaining are generally lower handicap players who are comparing the irons to their equipment.

 

I play with a lot of mid-high handicap players at my club and nearly all of them could benefit from more height and more distance with their irons. At the speed they're swinging the club, an M4 7-iron with 28.5 degrees of loft will now fly closer to a "standard" 7-iron distance and will have greater stopping power than they had before. This can only lead to more enjoyment of the game. How is that a bad thing?

 

Finally, whenever this debate comes up I like to draw parallels with driver lofts. No one complains that we have the ability to select a driver with lofts anywhere from 7.5 degrees through 12-14 degrees. That's not considered loft jacking because we all understand different players require different launch conditions to deliver the best performance, regardless of the loft. The modern GI iron is no different in my eyes. There are various types of irons on the market and the player should be picking the set that optimizes their launch conditions for best performance. For some, that will be a P730. For others, that will be an M4.

0 Kudos
Reply
Frequent Contributor

With the techical advances of the modern GI club, players would want the flight to be similar to what they are used to. If the flight was too high, because of lower CG, they would complain of the ball ballooning! 

 

As an aging golfer, I am happy wit the flight and distance that I get from my current irons(P-770). But, someday I will need to gain back some distance. So I don't care how TM does it! Jacked lofts, Tungsten, whatever!

Reply
Highlighted
Thefreddyv
Occasional Contributor
This right here is a well thought out answer. Thank you JLL62!
0 Kudos
Reply
HighPlainsDrive
Occasional Contributor

- do you understand why lofts are getting stronger on some irons? Yes

- is a 30 degree 7 iron nowadays an issue if it still performs as expected? No

- is hitting higher and longer shots for mid-high handicap golfers necessarily a bad thing? Not at all. As a matter of fact, I am a huge fan of low offset, stronger lofted irons so that I can carry 4 - PW, 3 additional wedges (gap/sand/lob), and still squeeze driver, 3 wood, and 5 wood in. Covering the same distances with 7 irons vs 8, while still having good gapping, is one of the biggest benefits no one talks about in my opinion.

Reply