Best Workouts to Improve Golf Game

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HillaryWyse
Occasional Contributor

I'm always looking for ways to get better and know that a good workout plan off the course is so important for that.  My two favorite things to do off the course are yoga and the Bar Method.  Both really help my strength and my flexibility.  They also encourage stretching, which is great for recovery.  

 

What other workouts would you recommend? 

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Community Manager
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I've actually spent a lot of time researching this and there is defintiely a lack of quality information. 

 

I think it boils down to your fitness goals. If you're trying to gain strength, the following article sounds well research (though the author's face intensely creeps me out): http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/golfers-guide-to-strength-training.html

 

If you're looking to be strong, flexible, and lean, I've actually read a lot of people saw some improvement in their games doing the p90x program. I've done p90x before and its pretty extreme, but definitely got me in some of the best athletic shape of my life. 

 

I currently started a mix of strength training and yoga. Ultimately, I don't think you can do wrong especially if you mix in high intencity workouts for endurance and then do something like yoga or a stretching routine to keep limber. 

Content/Social Media Manager at TaylorMade Golf
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drbrianmann
Contributor

You're spot on with the yoga. 

 

Golf fitness is becoming a huge deal as of late so you'll either see a ton of conflicting information, or it'll be so much info you don't know what to choose.

 

As far as golf improvement I'm a big fan of simply getting stronger. Free weights, eating correctly, increasing weight, etc.

 

The main thing is to make sure you're taking a handful of swings the opposite direction each time you play. For you it looks like that would mean to take 25-50 left handed swings each time. 

 

I get a lot of golfers with lower back pain, rib pain, middle back pain, etc. simply because they're not moving symmetrically. Golf is an asymmetrical sport so we need to make sure we are moving both directions.

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Community Manager
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@drbrianmann wrote:

You're spot on with the yoga. 

 

Golf fitness is becoming a huge deal as of late so you'll either see a ton of conflicting information, or it'll be so much info you don't know what to choose.

 

As far as golf improvement I'm a big fan of simply getting stronger. Free weights, eating correctly, increasing weight, etc.

 

The main thing is to make sure you're taking a handful of swings the opposite direction each time you play. For you it looks like that would mean to take 25-50 left handed swings each time. 

 

I get a lot of golfers with lower back pain, rib pain, middle back pain, etc. simply because they're not moving symmetrically. Golf is an asymmetrical sport so we need to make sure we are moving both directions.


Taking left-handed swings is an interesting concept and could also be a way to warm up it seems like. Good little tid bit to keep in mind. 

Content/Social Media Manager at TaylorMade Golf
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Frequent Contributor

I cannot agree more. There are lots of programs that now include stretching for flexibility as well as working both sides of your body. I find that when I started swinging left handed in my practice I gained flexibility and actually improved my normal swing. I am not a big fan of golf training aids but one that I do incorporate is the Orange whip at the recommendation of an instructor I was working with. One of my biggest issues is over-swinging and muscling the club which kills clubhead speed and often causes a slice. Using this on my back deck each evening has helped me focus on first transitioning my weight with my lower body and focusing on being long and smooth coming through. It is a much faster and more controlled swing and I work on both right handed and left handed swings with this.

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HillaryWyse
Occasional Contributor

I've actually added another workout to my routine that is definitely helping my game.  If you follow me on Twitter or Instagram, you know I'm obsessed with boxing.  I box 3-4 times a week lately, and it has increased my leg and core strength tremendously.  Like golf, a boxer's strenght is heavily dependent on the legs.  Also, despite the intensity of the sport, there is a calm state of mind associated with boxing.  It has improved my focus and helped me to not get so wound up about bad shots on the course. 

 

I highly recommend boxing for anyone looking to improve their game/general health! 

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DennisMiller
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For me, there are a variety of aspects to my so called personal golf fitness. One is my diet. I still have a gut, but I'm down from 310 to 246 over a couple years.

 

Along with that, at 68 years old, my biggest problem is loosening up. One of the courses I play doesn't have a range where I can hit balls, so I made my own solution.

 

I bought a net for my backyard and while working at a local course, was able to purchase one of the old range mats when they replaced them. I can hit balls under my mango tree any time I want.

IMG_1345.JPG

 

Better than that, I have 2 gadgets that work. One is a stretching pole with instructions on it that are golf specific. The other is a SKLZ gadget with a heavy ball on one end, a grip on the other end and a highly flexible shaft. It stays in the bag and when I need to loosen up, I can swing it around a variety of directions to stretch my muscles.

 

The rest of my so called exercise plan is just minor working with a set of 2 pound weights. I do wrist curls and a variety of arm lifts.I usually do this for my arms while I'm walking to keep some muscle tone in my legs.

 

My wife teases me that I only do all this because one day I saw some crepe skin on my upper arm and I want to fill it out because I can't admit my age. The woman knows me...

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Bomber_11
Occasional Contributor

I really like compound movements for training overall athleticism - which leads into golf (as it's a sport)

 

I don't do anything incredibly heavy - everything is done for form and for full extension/contraction.

 

Some of my favorites:

  • Deadlift
  • Straight Leg Deadlift
  • Hang Clean
  • Power Clean
  • Clean & Jerk
  • Squat
  • Front Squat
  • Bent Over Row

Also, lots of core work. Plank, hanging leg raise, russian twist, medicine ball twist, etc.

 

For anyone that enjoys things like P90X, try the Master's Hammer & Chisel program. I've seen great results from it.

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