Still on a high from The Open

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I missed the final round cut by one at our state open this weekend, so I was home watching the final round of The Open on Sunday instead of playing. Talk about a silver lining! I'm still amazed by what we saw. Anyone who has played competitively understands how time seems to speed up when things are getting out of control. It's a horrible feeling because you know the round is getting away from you, but there's little you can do to stop it. Every error seems to compound those that already occurred. You're telling yourself to slow down, but your brain is racing and you just can't get out of it.

 

This is what makes Spieth's round so incredible. He got a bad break on hole 1 and immediately played the victim card instead of accepting the result and moving on. That set the tone for the first 12 holes. The way he was able to clear his head and work through the situation on hole 13 is nothing short of remarkable. The way he was able to hit the reset button and close the way in which he did was historic. I'm in awe.

 

I can't wait for the PGA Championship.

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Community Manager
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Bum deal on missing the cut by 1 but sounds like you played pretty well. 

 

I've always admired and have been envious of top athletes mental fortitude. The Kobes, Ray Lewises, and Spieths of the world are just on a different level. This is a bold statement, but I think athletes at the top of their sport literally go insane during play. 

 

I've seen it with collegiate athletes. They are obsessed with winning to the point where it gets uncomfortable. I was playing $5 blackjack with a friends brother who played in the NBA and currently plays in Europe. He's a proper millionaire and was becoming furious at losing blackjack hands. Not because he was losing money, but because he was losing. 

 

Spieth is definitely a different person between the ropes. I think the reason he does so well in majors is because he just wants it more than everyone. 

Content/Social Media Manager at TaylorMade Golf
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DennisMiller
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I know exactly the feeling you described when you can't slow down and try to get a handle on a round that is going bad in front of your eyes. When I played in college, (University of Louisville), I had way too many days when I saw myself or a teammate do that. At the least, congratulations for the effort you made. Hopefully the time comes in the future when you can use what you've learned this time and hold the round together.

 

Now, at 68 years old, I feel exactly the same way when a round goes bad, sometimes as early as the second hole!    :-)

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