Recovering from broken Ankle?

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Jduz1
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Hey!  I'm hoping for a little advice:  Late in the season last year I went for a run (which I now know was mistake number 1) and broke my left ankle.  Obviously, I lost the rest of the golf season to it.  I'm technically fully recovered now but still feel twinges of pain there ocassionally while running and while golfing.  I'm right handed so it's my lead ankle and obviously it needs to be strong enough to hold when I roll over it on a golf swing.  I think it is, but can't quite shake the discomfort -- I think it may be partially mental.  Have any of you dealt with this?  How did you get over the fear of re-injuring yourself and just settle back into the game?  

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drbrianmann
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The best way to get over the mental aspect is just getting in more reps. Play more golf and hit more balls. 

 

I've had to come back from two orthopedic surgeries and the first few months you're always a little uneasy.

 

I'd need to know a little more to give any real advice.

Did you have surgery?

 

How long was PT? What was broken?  

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Jduz1
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Thanks!  It was a high ankle sprain and multiple avulsion fractures.  No surgery necessary: Just a month in a walking boot and 16 weeks of physical therepy.  I suspect you're right: it's just reps.

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@Jduz1 wrote:

Hey!  I'm hoping for a little advice:  Late in the season last year I went for a run (which I now know was mistake number 1) and broke my left ankle.  Obviously, I lost the rest of the golf season to it.  I'm technically fully recovered now but still feel twinges of pain there ocassionally while running and while golfing.  I'm right handed so it's my lead ankle and obviously it needs to be strong enough to hold when I roll over it on a golf swing.  I think it is, but can't quite shake the discomfort -- I think it may be partially mental.  Have any of you dealt with this?  How did you get over the fear of re-injuring yourself and just settle back into the game?  


I broke my elbow (coronoid process [the little bit of bone on my elbow that connects to my bicep last September. I started swinging a club in November and it was terrifying and sometimes painful. I was pretty familiar with "good pain" and "bad pain" through physical therapy so my ortho advised me to push through unless it was bad pain. 

 

It's been 7 months now and I'm back to full strength but my arm still feels some pain just about every round and I've been told I'll have pain for up to a year and potentially the rest of my life. 

 

All that being said, I've probably played 30 rounds since breaking it...

Content/Social Media Manager at TaylorMade Golf
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paull
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I've broken my left ankle 3 times, and sprained it numerous times.  Which makes golfing on it challenging at times -- there are rounds where I'm in lots of pain and can hardly walk by the 18th hole (which of course doesn't mean I stop playing!).

 

I'm going to have to have surgery on it within the next year (doc says partially detached tendon and bone spurs in addition to overall 'weakness'), but in the meantime I've come up with ways to let me keep playing.  One is a good ankle brace -- one that supports the lead-foot twist golf requires, and keeps the ankle from going too far.  That and some 4% lidocaine spray let me play and feel normal. 

In your case, I'd suggest the brace for a while as you rehab it, it will regain strength the more you use it, but in the meantime over-turning it could result in re-injury.  It'll also help your head, with some confidence that you won't hurt it.

Good luck!

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satchmodog
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I took a decade off after crushing my heel, L2 and L3 and tearing L5. I got an open reduction and subtalar fusion. We'll leave the back alone and go to the ankle. My heel was totally reconstructed from cadaver grafts, cages and plates. My surgeon is the guy who does the orthopedic work for the Brewers and said he never saw a worse break. Yay me!!

So my heel was screwed to my ankle with two nice long surgical steel screws and I have no lateral movement at all. I have to walk down stairs like a crab because it's still rather painful and not flexible enough to walk down properly on many stair types. You can imagine this affects your golf swing on the follow through. The back causes me issues with stiffness and a lot of immobility on most days, but that foot hurts 24/7 and it's screwed with my swing more than the back has.That all being said, I got most of my swing back after a summer of practice, as well as a majority of my distance. I was always a long hitter, out driving my father when I was 16, so I wasn't going to settle for being a duffer. 

The combination of back and heel/ankle have thrown my game off a lot, but keeping at it and working through a lot of frustration has paid off. I'm still not where I want to be, but the progress is immense. I  have worked on keeping a traditional swing, instead of swinging flat footed for a lot of obvious reasons.

My advice is to simply keep swinging until everything works and feels natural. I was afraid to swing after my attempt at year 1 anniversay of the accident didn't go as smoothly as I'd hoped. Obviously our issues are totally different, but in reality, after six months, your bones are rock solid unless you have some condition that makes your bones weak. You shouldn't be afraid to do anything with the foot, and after a year to 18 months, you're generally better than ever.

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